Warwick District Council’s Local List of Heritage Assets recognises buildings, structures, landscapes, and archaeological sites that fall below the national criteria for Listing but are still of special local significance.

Local Plan Policy HE3 ‘Locally Listed Historic Assets’ sets out the Council’s policy in relation to the Local List and to determining planning applications effecting properties on the List. The Council will have regard to preserving the significance of assets on the List, for example changes to buildings will be expected to use traditional detailing and materials.  A Heritage Statement should be included with any application that affects a property on the Local List.

The Council may consider approving an Article 4 Direction to control development that would normally be ‘permitted development’ not requiring planning permission in relation to locally listed buildings, but only if there is a clear threat to the building’s survival or significance.

New Proposals

If you have a proposal for an addition to the Local List please use the form below for your submission. The statement of significance on the form is particularly important (future development proposals will be assessed against the asset’s significance). Please also include a site location plan and photographs of the property if possible

Property owners of sites proposed for inclusion will be written to and will be advised of the implications of local listing.

Properties that are already designated heritage assets cannot be included on the Local List.

Application form (PDF)

In order to be locally listed an asset must:

  • Meet at least one of the letters in category 1.
  • Meet at least one of the letters in category 2.

 

Category 1

Building, group of buildings, or other structure: including (but not limited to) domestic dwellings, commercial premises, places of worship, public buildings or structures including war memorials, public art works, and fixed elements of the street-scene such as telephone boxes, clock towers, water pumps, gas lights.

A 1

Architectural, aesthetic, and artistic merit: the asset has importance due to its architectural design, decoration, construction or craftsmanship either on its own or as part of a group, demonstrating important local architectural styles, types of buildings, materials, building techniques, or local human artistic endeavour.

A 2

Historic merit: the asset illustrates an important element of the area’s history, development, and/or can be associated with an important local historic figure or event.

A 3

Landmark status: the asset is a key element in a valued local scene, contributes significantly to the positive aesthetic of an area, and is a geographical or cultural orientation point

Designed landscape or place: this could include (but is not limited to) a park, garden, cemetery, town square, institutional landscape, memorial landscape, a rural or urban landscape, or a streetscape.

 

B 1

Historic merit: the asset illustrates an important element of the area’s history, development, and/or can be associated with an important local historic figure or event.

B 2

Landscape and group quality: The asset demonstrates the historic interaction between people and places for aesthetic or practical purposes, including the development of a picturesque vista, possibly enhanced by association with physical features such as landforms, bridges, etc.

Archaeological monument or site: this can include buried archaeology and standing remains. A monument or site doesn’t have to be ‘ancient’.

 

C 1

Historic merit: the asset illustrates an important element of the area’s history, development, and/or can be associated with an important local historic figure or event.

C 2

Landscape and group quality: there is evidence to suggest the asset does or may, through expert investigation, provide primary evidence relating to the substance and evolution of places and the people and cultures that made them.

 

Category 2

A

Age and integrity: the asset is particularly old or of a date significant to the area, retaining a level of historic material and form proportionate to its age.  

B

Rarity or representativeness: the asset is an unusual or unique surviving example of its type, or is an exceptional example of a particular asset type.

C

Community and social asset: The asset is of high value to the local community as representative of their local identity or symbolic of a localised collective memory.

 

Search for listed buildings 

Visit the Historic England website to search the list of listed and designated heritage sites